Music, Film & Theater

Durham University
Music, Film & Theater
Thomas Heywood

Hugh the Drover, completed in 1919 and premiered five years later by the short-lived British National Opera, has been called a romantic ballad opera, owing to its incorporation of popular English songs and spoken dialogue in place of recitative....

Durham University
Music, Film & Theater
Thomas Heywood

The history of nineteenth-century Italian music has been largely dominated by opera. This essay’s raison d'être is to offer readers a broader perspective on musical activity and reception in the decades before and after unification of the...

Australian National University
Music, Film & Theater
Rosalind Moran

The 2003 film ‘Sylvia’ purports to be a biopic of Sylvia Plath’s life, immortalising the troubled writer on-screen. The film is noteworthy not for its quality or historical accuracy, however – being lacking in both – but rather for how it adapts...

University of St Andrews
Music, Film & Theater
Alexandra Koronkai-Kiss

Within only a few decades a small group of nineteenth century Russian artists managed to change the content and style of contemporary landscape painting entirely. In fact, they brought about a revolution that completely transformed the genre as a...

University of Oxford
Music, Film & Theater
Ruth Spencer Jolly

This essay evaluates a specific form of appropriation: parody. It looks at the ways in which feminist artists in particular, wishing to expose oppressive phallic hegemony, parody patriarchal misogynist culture as a tool of critique. First the Law...

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Music, Film & Theater
Sarah Molina

Tourists and scholars alike have exclaimed at the intricate detail and magnificent illustrations of the Luttrell Psalter, a 14th-century manuscript now displayed at the British Library. However, amid the psalter’s scenes of religious and secular...

University College Dublin
Music, Film & Theater
Sophia McCarthy

Using psychoanalytic theory, this essay explores the visual and literary references to intrauterine entrapment within Samuel Beckett’s Not I and Happy Days. By drawing from Beckett’s own fascination with psychoanalysis...

Trinity College Dublin
Music, Film & Theater
Killian O'Dwyer

This essay takes as its prompt Henri Bergson's view that laughter is "above all, a corrective" intended to humiliate the person at whom it is directed, in terms of a much more modern text - the NBC sitcom Friends.

First, this essay...

Trinity College Dublin
Music, Film & Theater
Matthew Malone

This essay examines the ways in which Tony Kushner’s two­part work for the theatre, Angels in America (1991), may be read as a disruption of theatre traditional representations of the American dramatic canon, outlining the ways in which...